Chris Fornesa ‐ Dev Portfolio

Hello there, I am a front-end website developer with a passion for UX/UI design, graphic design, and exploring my creativity.


Profile

About Me

  • As a graphic and web designer, I have learned that the most important skill in creating a successful design is to listen to both your intuition and your client. So whether I am designing a website or creating a logo, I seek user input at every step of the way, regardless of frustrations, time, and effort. I also value the perspectives of others in crafting my designs and see every opportunity to work with someone on any graphic or web design project as a way to improve both my craft and my art as a whole.

Contact Information

  • Location: Stafford, TX
  • Phone: (281) 400-1920
  • Email: creative@cftxp.co

Experience

Web and Graphic Designer for Dayodman.com.

  • Dayodman is a multi-talented artist with expertise that spans nearly the entire spectrum of the music industry.
  • This multi-site project involved the Wix platform for the main website, and HTML, CSS, PHP, and JavaScript for the NGNS Shortlinks and Dayodman's Music Portal.
  • I also created the main logo used for Dayodman/NGNS.
  • This is an ongoing collaborative project to showcase our skills as artists.

Creative Hope Creative Showcase Logo and Advertisement designer. September 20, 2017.

  • As a collaborative showcase of artists, we raised over $180 in on-site donations for our neighbors in need in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.
  • My contributions included the set of logos used in the advertising throughout the event, the design of the advertising itself, and the creation of the Creative Hope Website.

Projects

Portfolio Websites - To prove my competencies in programming and web development I developed several portfolio websites catered to each programming language and framework that I have worked with.

  • This website is my main web development portfolio and showcases both my PHP and React portfolios through the implementation of iframes which, as a system, allow this application to function as a progressive web application.
  • My PHP portfolio showcases the various PHP websites that I have created, most of which have been created using object-oriented PHP components and many also include JavaScript to solve problems better suited for a non server-side solution.
  • My React portfolio showcases the various React applications that I have created using the React framework built on the JavaScript programming language.

Privilege Application(s) - The Privilege application is a thought experiment that explores the many nuances of privilege regarding race and ethnicity.

  • I built a PHP and a React version of the same Privilege application to explore the similarities, differences, and functionalities of the PHP programming language and the React framework.
  • The PHP version of the Privilege application is the original application. The PHP Privilege application contains the following programming components: a main 'Race' class containing references to the four different classifications (the privileged race, the enslaved race, the indigenous race, and the othered race) and a reference to the new world, then there's a PHP class created for each race (white, Black, First Nations, and Asian) with references to the homeland and majority religion of the chosen race.
  • The React Privilege application objectifies the privileged race, the enslaved race, the indigenous race, the othered race, the homeland of the privileged race, the new world (homeland of the indigenous race), and the privileged race's majority religion as React states and properties allocated to sub-components.

Time Application(s) - The Time application is a simple live clock that displays today's date and the current time in both 12 and 24-hour format.

  • I built a PHP and a React version of the same Time application to explore the similarities, differences, and functionalities of the PHP programming language and the React framework.
  • The PHP Time application contains the following programming components: a current date component that uses the Date object in PHP to display the current date, the current time component which calls on the custom JavaScript Time class to obtain the 12 and 24-hour clocks, while the main JavaScript file contains a 'refreshTime' function that is automatically called every second to refresh the current time on both clocks in the application.
  • The React version of the Time application is the original application. The React Time application contains the following programming components: a component for the current date, which calls on the Date object to display today's date and refreshes based on the appropriate interval, and a component for the current time, which displays the current time in 12 and 24-hour format by calling the Date object, then refreshing at the appropriate interval (for the 12-hour clock) or refreshing each component appropriately (the hour, minute and second in the 24-hour clock).

Art Portfolio(s) - My art portfolio application is a detailed showcase of my artwork, which includes drawings, paintings, mixed media paintings, and digital art.

  • I built a PHP and a React version of the same art portfolio application to explore the similarities, differences, and functionalities of the PHP programming language and the React framework.
  • The React version of my art portfolio is the original application. My React art portfolio contains the following programming components: a List component that outputs a list of items, where each item is represented by an Item component that serves as a manifestation of each art piece and its relevant details.

Education

Master of Science in Information Technology, Software Design and Management: Graduate Courses, May 2019. Liberty University. Lynchburg, VA.

  • Courses included:
    CSCI 501 ‐ Overview of Computer Security
    CSIS 505 ‐ Software Development
  • GPA: 4.00 (6 credit hours).

Master of Science in Information Technology, Software Design and Management: Undergraduate Prerequisites, October 2018. Liberty University. Lynchburg, VA.

  • Courses included:
    MATH 201 ‐ Introduction to Probability and Statistics
    CSIS 212 ‐ Object‐Oriented Programming
    CSIS 312 ‐ Advanced Object‐Oriented Programming
    CSIS 330 ‐ Business Data Communications
  • GPA: 4.00 (12 credit hours).

Level I Certificate (12 credits) ‐ Digital Communication, Web Publishing specialization, May 2016. Houston Community College ‐ Southwest. Stafford, TX.

  • Dean‘s List: Spring 2016.
  • 4.00 GPA.

Other Education

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, May 2018. University of Houston. Houston, TX.

  • Minors: Studio Art, Political Science, and Business Foundations.
  • Corporate Entrepreneurship Certificate (6 credits).
  • Dean‘s List: Fall 2016 ‐ Spring 2018.
  • GPA: 4.00. Graduated Summa Cum Laude.
  • Golden Key Honour Society, January 2018.

Associate of Arts - Liberal Arts, May 2015. Houston Community College ‐ Southwest. Stafford, TX.

  • Dean‘s List: Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016.
  • 4.00 GPA. Graduated with highest honors.
  • National Society of Collegiate Scholars, March 2015.
  • Phi Theta Kappa, November 2013.

Why I Code

I enjoy the process of building customized website solutions as humanity is complex and most our problems involve serious puzzles that we, as humans, must figure out. This is why I believe that the best way to solve any problem to understand (in my own way) the people directly involved and impacted by said problem. Learning about people and their problems gives me, as an autistic person, insight and access to portions of the human mind and connections to people that I, otherwise, would not be given. Every project where I must please a client is another opportunity for me to have this access and to further my understanding of humanity and human motivations, even if that client is myself (as it is for many of the projects that I have done).

Click here to download my resume.


See more details about Chris or click here to get in touch.

PHP Portfolio

About My PHP Portfolio

Ever since I began using PHP to develop website front-ends and back-ends in the Summer of 2019, I have found its ease of use (and the ability to create custom components for building websites) invaluable to my workflow. Furthermore, the object-oriented implementations that are possible with PHP gave me a second chance to learn object-oriented programming concepts, which I have implemented most of the PHP applications that I have developed.

Programming Language/Framework: PHP.

Click here to see my PHP Portfolio and this link leads you to the code base of this application (which is hosted on Repl.it).

See more details about my PHP Portfolio and my relevant skills.

Objective

I developed my PHP portfolio website to showcase my ability to program in PHP, as well as my capacity to program in an object-oriented manner. In some of my PHP projects, I also implemented JavaScript classes and other object-oriented concepts using JavaScript.

Click here to explore the codebase for this application and click here to see the application itself.

Implementation

For my PHP portfolio, I decided to utilize a card structure, in which I feature an iframe featuring each website and the various details (e.g. implementation, features, lessons, etc.) about that application. I implemented this by creating the custom Item class by which each portfolio item was populated. Finally, I included other components (like the header and footer) to form a complete look for the application.

Features

In 'GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don'ts and Do's', Jeff Johnson stated that, rather than assuming that users are on a continuum from 'novice' to 'expert', it is better to place intended users 'along three independent knowledge dimensions:... General computer savvy: how much they know about computers in general... Task knowledge: how facile they are at performing the target task, e.g., accounting', and 'Knowledge of the system: how well they know the specific software product, or ones like it' (2007).

Considering both users and how they will interact with my PHP portfolio, I made sure that, firstly, that the design of the application was responsive (while I also ensured that this was the case for the applications that I featured as well). I also wanted to afford users the opportunity to use each application directly, so I made sure that the iframes contained each website as a fully-functional application. Both of these design considerations allow a user, whether they accessed my portfolio using a mobile device or a desktop computer, to directly access and use each application included in my portfolio. Finally, users are not automatically forced to view the case study and technical details provided for each application but, rather, they have the option to show or hide the details for each application. I did this for the sake of usability and design as not all users may be interested in seeing the lengthy details that I have provided for each application but it may be something that a user may like to see if the information can be hidden and shown on their own volition.

Lessons Learned

I credit this application with teaching me the fundamentals of class-based, object-oriented PHP and has served as my springboard to created other object-oriented PHP applications.

Because of the time that I have spent on this website, I have been able to learn about class features like methods, constructors, types of variables, and inheritance from the perspective of the PHP programming language.

Resources

Johnson, J. (2007). GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don’ts and Dos (2nd ed.). Burlington: Elsevier Science.

React Portfolio

About My React Portfolio

While I have been writing code in JavaScript since 2016, I only began using the React framework in the Summer of 2019. But over the time that I have spent working with the React has inspired me to continue working with application front-ends, while exploring its versatility has even led me to begin converting my websites into progressive web applications. In short, the React framework has offered me a new, more efficient way to create application front-ends.

Programming Language/Framework: JavaScript/React framework.

Click here to see my React Portfolio and this link leads you to the code base of this application (which is hosted on GitHub).

See more details about my React Portfolio and my relevant skills.

Objective

I developed my React portfolio website to showcase my ability to program in React, as well as my capacity to program in an object-oriented manner. In each project, I show my capabilities to program in an object-oriented manner through the use of React class components to create the front-end for each application.

Click here to explore the codebase for this application and click here to see the application itself.

Implementation

For my React portfolio, I decided to utilize a card structure, in which I feature an iframe featuring each website and the various details (e.g. implementation, features, lessons, etc.) about that application. I implemented this by creating the custom Item class by which each portfolio item was populated. Finally, I included other components (like the header and footer) to form a complete look for the application.

Features

In 'GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don'ts and Do's', Jeff Johnson stated that, rather than assuming that users are on a continuum from 'novice' to 'expert', it is better to place intended users 'along three independent knowledge dimensions:... General computer savvy: how much they know about computers in general... Task knowledge: how facile they are at performing the target task, e.g., accounting', and 'Knowledge of the system: how well they know the specific software product, or ones like it' (2007).

Considering both users and how they will interact with my PHP portfolio, I made sure that, firstly, that the design of the application was responsive (while I also ensured that this was the case for the applications that I featured as well). I also wanted to afford users the opportunity to use each application directly, so I made sure that the iframes contained each website as a fully-functional application. Both of these design considerations allow a user, whether they accessed my portfolio using a mobile device or a desktop computer, to directly access and use each application included in my portfolio. Finally, users are not automatically forced to view the case study and technical details provided for each application but, rather, they have the option to show or hide the details for each application. I did this for the sake of usability and design as not all users may be interested in seeing the lengthy details that I have provided for each application but it may be something that a user may like to see if the information can be hidden and shown on their own volition.

Lessons Learned

As this was my first React application, by working on this project, I was able to learn the basics of JSX syntax and how to integrate basic JavaScript functionalities into the React framework.

Resources

Johnson, J. (2007). GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don’ts and Dos (2nd ed.). Burlington: Elsevier Science.

Django Portfolio

About My Django Portfolio

I did not write my first Python program until the Summer of 2019, and I only began using the Python framework in October of 2019. Thus, it's safe to say that I consider myself to be relatively new to the worlds of Python and Django. But learning how to replicate my PHP and React projects for Python, I can confidently state that I will definitely integrate Python, more and more, into my workflow as time goes by.

Programming Language/Framework: Python/Django framework.

Click here to see my Django Portfolio and this link leads you to the code base of this application (which is hosted on Repl.it).

See more details about my Django Portfolio and my relevant skills.

Objective

I developed my Django portfolio website to showcase my ability to program in Python and to challenge myself to create projects before I even &quo;properly&quo; know and understand the Python programming language. In each project, I prove my capacity to program through the MVC (Model-View-Controller) framework on which Django was created.

Click here to explore the codebase for this application and click here to see the application itself.

Implementation

For my Django portfolio, as in others, I decided to utilize a card structure, in which I feature an iframe featuring each website and the various details (e.g. implementation, features, lessons, etc.) about that application. I implemented this by creating the custom Item model in the custom Items application, by which each portfolio item is represented. With these items as the basis for the PostgreSQL database on which this application runs, the Items database items are passed in to the Items view and output into the main page. The main page of this website extends the base web page, and outputs each item in the Items object list as a new div element that displays the title, website, code source, about section, the relevant skill, the objective section, the implementation section, the features section, the lessons section, and the resources section. Finally, the main application's settings have the main application and the Item application as installed apps, the database settings of the PostgreSQL database, and the static and staticfiles set.

Features

In 'GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don'ts and Do's', Jeff Johnson stated that, rather than assuming that users are on a continuum from 'novice' to 'expert', it is better to place intended users 'along three independent knowledge dimensions:... General computer savvy: how much they know about computers in general... Task knowledge: how facile they are at performing the target task, e.g., accounting', and 'Knowledge of the system: how well they know the specific software product, or ones like it' (2007).

Considering both users and how they will interact with my Django portfolio, I made sure that, firstly, that the design of the application was responsive (while I also ensured that this was the case for the applications that I featured as well). I also wanted to afford users the opportunity to use each application directly, so I made sure that the iframes contained each website as a fully-functional application. Both of these design considerations allow a user, whether they accessed my portfolio using a mobile device or a desktop computer, to directly access and use each application included in my portfolio. Finally, users are not automatically forced to view the case study and technical details provided for each application but, rather, they have the option to show or hide the details for each application. I did this for the sake of usability and design as not all users may be interested in seeing the lengthy details that I have provided for each application but it may be something that a user may like to see if the information can be hidden and shown on their own volition.

Lessons Learned

As this was my first Django application, working on this project gave me a huge opportunity to get acquainted with Python, Django, and the MVC framework and my ongoing work with this, and future Django projects, will only heighten my proficiency in these concepts.

Resources

Johnson, J. (2007). GUI Bloopers 2.0 Common User Interface Design Don’ts and Dos (2nd ed.). Burlington: Elsevier Science.